Tag Archives: worth

Knowing Your Value and Embracing Your Worth

When you know your value, it changes the way you perceive the world (and others).

Settled in self-assurance and rooted in a healthy love for yourself, slights roll off like sunny-side-up eggs sliding off of a brand new-teflon frying pan.

Oh, but in the valleys of self-doubt where you are riddled with imposter syndrome and tormented by evidence of falling short? Every interaction supports your flawed premise.

Offending words, behaviors, and seeming rejections stick like flypaper to your soul.

Oh, to be free of that sticky paper consistently! It still attaches itself to me on occasion and like Taylor Swift, I gotta shake it off.

And remind myself who I am.

My friend Anita shared this story with me this week and I just loved it. I bet you will, too:

A father said to his daughter: You graduated with honors. Here is a car that I acquired many years ago … it is several years old.
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But before I give it to you, take it to the used car lot downtown and tell them I want to sell it and see how much they offer you.
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The daughter went to the used car lot, returned to her father, and said, “They offered me $1,000 because it looks very worn out.” The father said, “Take it to the pawnshop.”

The daughter went to the pawnshop, returned to her father, and said, “The pawnshop offered $100 because it was a very old car.” The father asked his daughter to go to a car club and show them the car.
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The daughter took the car to the club, returned, and told her father, “Some people in the club offered $100,000 for it since it is a Nissan Skyline R34, an iconic car and sought after by many.”
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The father said to his daughter, “I wanted you to know that the right place values ​​you the right way.” If you are not valued, do not be angry, it means you are in the wrong place. Those who know your value are those who appreciate you. Never stay in a place where no one sees your value.

– UNKNOWN

Can you imagine the horror if she had accepted the used car dealership’s offer? Or the pawn shop? Sheesh!

But until you know the value of what you have, you’ll accept less than you’re worth.

This subject of knowing your value and embracing your worth came up this week at my niece, Deena’s, virtual baby shower. Yes! The beautiful Deena who designed the font for the cards I pull every two weeks is gonna be a Mama in October!

All of the shower attendees were invited to offer advice on being a good parent or a lesson learned to encourage and support Deena.

I couldn’t cough anything up! In my mind, since I’d never given birth who am I to say anything?

And then the universe dropped this into my lap from my beloved Abraham Hicks:

Relative to our children or any children with whom we would interact, our one dominant intention would be to give them a conscious understanding of how powerful and important and valuable and perfect they are.

Every word that would come out of our mouths would be a word that would be offered with the desire to help this individual know that they are powerful. It would be a word of empowerment. We would set the tone for upliftment and understand that everything will gravitate to that tone if maintained consistently.

– ABRAHAM HICKS

Can you just imagine how blessed a child would be having been brought up THAT way?

Powerful. Empowered! Valuable! Confident!

Made me a little jealous thinking about babies nurtured in such an environment.

And then I thought: I am the CEO of ME.

I can nurture myself with the truth of my value and worth.

And so can you.

It really does help to eliminate the sticky flypaper!

Thoughts on my “question mark” weeks here, and a new word we can all let sooth our hearts:

And that’s a recipe for a great-ful couple of weeks.

Love, love, love –

Brenda

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Waking Up to What’s Really Important

In my teens, it was really important to date a guy with a nice car who was popular enough to help me climb the social ladder.

In my twenties, he had to also have a good job/money, as well as be able to dance well. But he didn’t stand a chance against my career ambitions, which always took precedence over love.

In my thirties, I disappeared (perhaps from disappointment over my less than successful 20’s) into the false safety of what I believed to be my holy calling. What was important was doing God’s will and learning how to abandon my own. I detached from people, places, and things – including my own thoughts and feelings.

My forties ushered in with an abrupt realization that the previous decade had largely been a sham. It became important again to have fun. To try and make up for lost time. With zeal I launched back into my lost career and tried to take as many vacations as possible. Washed down with huge quantities of red wine.

Here we now are, past my mid-fifties. How can it be?

It was just yesterday I was hoping Randy Crowell would ask me to the prom. My QVC auditions feel like they occurred last month. My wedding…and subsequent divorce. Such landmarks, now ever diminishing with each passing day.

My fifties? These years awakened me to what is really important.

When you have little, it’s easy to think that having stuff will make all the difference.

Finally being able to pay the bills on time and not overdraft my checking account used to be really important. Now it’s a non-issue, thank God.

The next evolution involved being able to buy those Jimmy Choos. Or that baby blue car of my dreams.

What did I learn?

These are momentarily joyous, like the sugar rush flooding my bloodstream after downing a creme-filled donut.

Don’t get me wrong, I still love me some creme-filled donuts. White creme, not Boston cream, for those who care about the particulars.

But the rich stuff? The really important stuff?

I have discovered the deep and satisfying joy of sitting on the couch next to someone who holds my hand.

Cracking up over a stupid meme on Facebook and sharing it with a bestie.

Taking an impromptu trip to the beach to wiggle my toes in the sand and enjoy the setting of the sun.

Rubbing my mom’s feet at the end of a long day of her doctor’s visits.

How could I have been so blind to what was really important?

Hindsight offers perspective.

For me, it boiled down to settling my own worth. When I finally did that, I no longer needed to find it in cars, or boyfriends, or career wins, or designer shoes. I no longer needed to hide from life in a flurry of activity or spiritual pursuits.

Settling into our own worthiness is the great awakening.

And now, a brand, spanking new Word of the Week:

https://youtu.be/QG1sQZMbMk8

May our eyes be open to see…what is really important.

xoxoxoxo

Brenda

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